Why are hospitals struggling to get doctors to work in Egypt?

By Michael O’Leary, BBC Egypt correspondentAt a hospital in Cairo, Dr Mahmoud Abdul Aziz sits on a stool, waiting for a test.

A few minutes later, he’ll be in charge of treating a patient.

He’s been there for about 10 days, and it’s been a bumpy road for him, from being a private doctor to a doctor in the capital.

“We’ve had two cases where the patient didn’t die, but we don’t know how many,” he says.

“There’s a lot of paperwork and paperwork is hard to understand.”

His colleague, Dr Mohamed Salah, who is also in the hospital, is similarly baffled.

“We need to get a new test to be sure, we don`t know if it is an infection or not.”

It was the first time they had seen each other in nearly a year.

But they’ve been talking about their plans for the future – to take a position in the private sector, to work for a healthcare provider.

The only job they had previously was working in the health ministry, and while they both had some experience, they had little in common.

“I was going to do some work with a private company,” says Dr Abdul Azaz, “but when we went to work with the health department, they said, ‘We want you to be a doctor.'”

That meant working as an extra in hospitals.

So Dr Abdul’s wife, Fatima, decided to take the plunge.

After working for a private hospital, they moved to the capital to become doctors, working under a contract from the government.

The salary was $80 (£60) a month, and they were given free healthcare, but they also had to sign contracts guaranteeing they wouldn’t be exploited by private hospitals.

And if they were exploited, they were expected to be punished.

So, they decided to leave.

“It was hard,” Dr Abdul says.

They were working in hospitals without proper health insurance, and when one patient died from complications, they didn’t get paid for the work.

It wasn’t just the patients who were being exploited, but the workers too.

“The system is broken,” says Fatima.

The system of healthcare in Egypt is “very broken” and needs to be reformed.

“One of the main reasons for the outbreak of the epidemic is the lack of awareness,” says Salah.

“Many hospitals are working without health insurance and the patients don’t have access to healthcare.”

What we know about the virus: The virus: ‘We are trying to stop the spread’ Dr Abdul was one of the first to be infected.

“On February 25, I started bleeding, and my blood pressure went up,” he remembers.

“My blood pressure was like 400.

The doctors told me to take it easy and stop bleeding.”

The infection didn’t last long.

The next day, he got another test and it showed that he had the virus.

“They told me that I have a very high infection rate,” he recalls.

“That’s when I started taking medication.

Then I started getting symptoms.”

On February 27, the hospital said they had tested positive.

“As soon as we tested positive, the doctor in charge said, `You must be the patient.

You should be treated,'” he says, adding that he never got paid.

“In a normal hospital, you would have been treated for a couple of days.

We didn’t know what we were doing.

We were trying to get them to get an MRI scan of the patient, but there was nothing.

They said they needed to wait for the results from the MRI scan to come back, and then they would pay us.”

“We couldn’t understand what was happening,” he continues.

“When we first started treating him, we didn’t see the symptoms,” he explains. “

“Then, when I saw them, they all started to show symptoms. “

When we first started treating him, we didn’t see the symptoms,” he explains.

“Then, when I saw them, they all started to show symptoms.

“During that time, my blood pressures went up, my pulse started to go up, and I had a fever.” “

They said it was very bad, so I had to stay in the intensive care unit for about a month,” he said.

“During that time, my blood pressures went up, my pulse started to go up, and I had a fever.”

The next month, Dr Abdul had a second infection, and another three in the first week of March.

“Every time I started coughing, my fever increased.

I was afraid that I would die, so the doctors were afraid that they would be killed.

So we didn`t go to work.

We stayed at home and waited for the MRI to come.”

But he never saw a doctor.

“After three days, I had another infection,” he tells me.

“This time, I got a blood